BBC London have revealed in a report that crime involving mopeds has gone up by more than 600% in the past two years.

In 2016 there were more than 7500 of those offences, that's about 22 per day. Those statistics include attacks, robberies and nicking our beloved bikes. But it looks like London Met are denying the problem is out of control.

Moped enabled crime affects other big cities in the UK but as with most issues, London is hit the worst. Tourists with mobile phones and large numbers of high-end shops make the capital an attractive target for the would be thieves.

Superintendent Mark Payne, who runs Operation Venice, the task force which is meant to be tackling the problem, told the BBC: " I think it's a huge concern because it is a change in criminal behaviour.

"The fact of the matter is it's much more difficutlt to deal with people on mopeds than it was people who were comitting those sorts of crimes before on foot or on bicycles."

Despite having a list drawn up of some 200 suspects, the Met say many escape prosecution because of lack of evidence. And as you may well know, if the criminals take off their helmets, they can't be pursued for concerns for their safety. 

That might seem ridiculous but four officers from Islington are facing disciplinary action over Henry Hicks, a teenager who died in an unauthorised pursuit in Islington in 2012. 

The Met are using methods that were employed for the notorious Al Capone. Catching the repeat offenders on less serious crimes like having no insurance, no license or riding without a license plate. 

But once again the police are urging moped and bike owners to use more locks. As if we don't already. Have they seen the angle grinders and bolt cutters? 

With a bit more media attention, we hope Transport for London perk up a bit and put some more effort into tackling bike theft. It's about time.




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